Opinion

Time to take a stand.

Sustainability is often the subject of controversial debate: It seems that there isn’t the one right solution. Find out now what our point of view is regarding certain issues.

Seals of quality

Say no to badge mania!

When it comes to sustainable foodstuff, seals of quality naturally play an important role. Nevertheless, we believe that it’s our true intentions that rule – not he number of badges we’ve got.

In fact, we feel that no seal in the world can explain well enough what matters to us. That’s why we don’t focus on meeting certain eco badge critera. Instead, we focus on those issues that seem to have the largest leverage effect for more sustainability.

Imagine for instance that electric vehicles covered all the transport routes within our value chain to keep CO2 emissions low. Is there a seal for it? No. Are we working on the implementation anyway? Hell yes.

Instead of fighting for ever more eco laurels we invest our time in those issues that really matter to us. It goes without saying that we’ve got a number of quality seals regardless.

Seals of quality

Say no to badge mania!

When it comes to sustainable foodstuff, seals of quality naturally play an important role. Nevertheless, we believe that it’s our true intentions that rule – not he number of badges we’ve got.

In fact, we feel that no seal in the world can explain well enough what matters to us. That’s why we don’t focus on meeting certain eco badge critera. Instead, we focus on those issues that seem to have the largest leverage effect for more sustainability.

Imagine for instance that electric vehicles covered all the transport routes within our value chain to keep CO2 emissions low. Is there a seal for it? No. Are we working on the implementation anyway? Hell yes.

Instead of fighting for ever more eco laurels we invest our time in those issues that really matter to us. It goes without saying that we’ve got a number of quality seals regardless.

Regionality

When everyone around us is winning.

When it comes to sustainability and the circular economy concept, regionality is again and again mentioned as a decisive factor. But what does that actually mean? And is regionality automatically a good thing?

Let’s presume we wanted to manufacture our cheese 100% locally. Then we’d have to build as many production facilities as there are regions in Germany – which isn’t really feasible.

How about this, though: What if our activities promoted a particular region? That could also be the meaning of regionality.

Right now, LiebKost cheese is manufactured in a factory in Dieue-sur-Meuse (Lorraine) near the French-German border. The reasons for that are:

  • Our partner Hochland already runs a factory there that is best suited to manufacture our type of cheese.
  • From the sourcing of ingredients to packaging: The region around this site offers top conditions for our circular economy approach.

We must admit that the ingredients for our cheese – notably the milk – are currently being lugged through half of Europe. Rest assured, though: We’re working flat out in cooperation with Hochland and the farms around Dieue to find a sustainable, local solution.

What about involving the regions we’re selling LiebKost in? Take our Berlin test market: We’re currently starting a series of co-operations with local partners whose products go well with LiebKost. That could be anything from sauces and chutneys to spices and much more. For us, that is regionality, too.

Regionality

When everyone around us is winning.

When it comes to sustainability and the circular economy concept, regionality is again and again mentioned as a decisive factor. But what does that actually mean? And is regionality automatically a good thing?

Let’s presume we wanted to manufacture our cheese 100% locally. Then we’d have to build as many production facilities as there are regions in Germany – which isn’t really feasible.

How about this, though: What if our activities promoted a particular region? That could also be the meaning of regionality.

Right now, LiebKost cheese is manufactured in a factory in Dieue-sur-Meuse (Lorraine) near the French-German border. The reasons for that are:

  • Our partner Hochland already runs a factory there that is best suited to manufacture our type of cheese.
  • From the sourcing of ingredients to packaging: The region around this site offers top conditions for our circular economy approach.

We must admit that the ingredients for our cheese – notably the milk – are currently being lugged through half of Europe. Rest assured, though: We’re working flat out in cooperation with Hochland and the farms around Dieue to find a sustainable, local solution.

What about involving the regions we’re selling LiebKost in? Take our Berlin test market: We’re currently starting a series of co-operations with local partners whose products go well with LiebKost. That could be anything from sauces and chutneys to spices and much more. For us, that is regionality, too.

Milk

Passionate farmers, good milk.

So, there’s this thing about cow’s milk. And we don’t even refer to rearing conditions that are or aren’t animal-friendly. Fact is: Dairy cows in Germany often eat soy food that is imported from afar, e.g. Brasil, and that are cultivated with the use of plenty of chemical pesticides. The result: a huge CO2 footprint, less and less biological diversity and polluted drinking water.

Cow’s milk per se isn’t bad, though – if and only if the cow eats grass, has sufficient space and no chemicals pollute the manufacturing process. That’s why we exclusively cooperate with dairy farmers who have a maximum of 60-100 cows. They look after the welfare of their livestock with a lot of dedication and of their own accord – and most definitely not in order to receive an ecological badge. This is the only way for milk to become a sustainable product again – and that’s exactly what we want to achieve.

Milk

Passionate farmers, good milk.

So, there’s this thing about cow’s milk. And we don’t even refer to rearing conditions that are or aren’t animal-friendly. Fact is: Dairy cows in Germany often eat soy food that is imported from afar, e.g. Brasil, and that are cultivated with the use of plenty of chemical pesticides. The result: a huge CO2 footprint, less and less biological diversity and polluted drinking water.

Cow’s milk per se isn’t bad, though – if and only if the cow eats grass, has sufficient space and no chemicals pollute the manufacturing process. That’s why we exclusively cooperate with dairy farmers who have a maximum of 60-100 cows. They look after the welfare of their livestock with a lot of dedication and of their own accord – and most definitely not in order to receive an ecological badge. This is the only way for milk to become a sustainable product again – and that’s exactly what we want to achieve.

Hochland

When David and Goliath make common cause.

If we really what to change something in the dairy industry everyone has to get on board. And leading the way, there should be at least one seriously large company. In our case it’s the food manufacturer and cheese maker Hochland from the Allgäu region in Germany.

The family business Hochland approached us with the following idea: to co-create a framework in which Hochland could test – outside its own organisational structures – how to do things differently, better, more sustainably. The idea was to go beyond the company’s already existing environmental commitment. After all, Hochland already prohibits its suppliers from using glyphosate and fertilizer contaminated with plastic.

That is a very good thing indeed. LiebKost, however, wants to go further: We have taken a step outside and assumed a whole new perspective – in Berlin. A perspective that allows us to question all the steps along the value chain, to suggest improvements and to find ways to implement them.

In a way we’re the dairy ghostbusters: We work like a startup and develop on our journey a new, sustainable brand in line with the principles of a circular economy. However, we don’t start from scratch. Quite the contrary: We’re relying on many years of experience, substantial resources and the technical knowhow of Hochland. Especially when it comes to production and quality standards this enables us to find the decisive leverage points to get us all towards our goal faster.

Hochland

When David and Goliath make common cause.

If we really what to change something in the dairy industry everyone has to get on board. And leading the way, there should be at least one seriously large company. In our case it’s the food manufacturer and cheese maker Hochland from the Allgäu region in Germany.

The family business Hochland approached us with the following idea: to co-create a framework in which Hochland could test – outside its own organisational structures – how to do things differently, better, more sustainably. The idea was to go beyond the company’s already existing environmental commitment. After all, Hochland already prohibits its suppliers from using glyphosate and fertilizer contaminated with plastic.

That is a very good thing indeed. LiebKost, however, wants to go further: We have taken a step outside and assumed a whole new perspective – in Berlin. A perspective that allows us to question all the steps along the value chain, to suggest improvements and to find ways to implement them.

In a way we’re the dairy ghostbusters: We work like a startup and develop on our journey a new, sustainable brand in line with the principles of a circular economy. However, we don’t start from scratch. Quite the contrary: We’re relying on many years of experience, substantial resources and the technical knowhow of Hochland. Especially when it comes to production and quality standards this enables us to find the decisive leverage points to get us all towards our goal faster.

Become a partner

Want to get involved?

Then get in touch. We’re open for ideas and cooperations.